Friday, June 4, 2010

Glove up for RV dumping

I used to empty my sewer tanks bare handed. I didn't like wearing the traditional type dish gloves because they are too bulky and I wasn't crazy about latex gloves because they would easily tear. Last year I was strolling down the isles at Harbor Freight (a tool store) when I noticed nitrile disposable gloves. Since I was building kitchen cabinets for my sister-in-law I decided to pick up a box for working with stain and varnish.
These gloves are thin enough that your sense of touch is not hindered and tough enough to stand up to mild chemical exposure. I liked them so much I decided to keep a box near my sewer clean-out compartment. Now I glove up before dumping and peel off the gloves and toss them into the trash when I'm done. They are coated with powder so they are easy to slip on and off. I like the extra large size even though I normally wear size large because putting them on is easier. You can also use these gloves for changing oil, painting, washing, waxing and many other applications. These gloves are available at big box stores and pharmacies.

Working with RVers hand in glove - Jim Twamley, Professor of RVing

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Jim, Jim, Jim...
As a former science/healt instructor, I must say that if you knew the health hazards you "hopefully" have dodged over the years, you would be horrified. I know you must know better. Many of the disease causing pathogens can be absorbed through the openings around the hair follicles on the knuckles and back of your hands. Even abrasions that do not bleed can admit these pathogens into your system. Please protect yourself...I love your articles.

Sarah said...

I recently switched to the Nitrile gloves from the latex ones with powder for gardening. the blue gloves are snug enough to maintain the sense of touch and hold up better. I bought a box for the DH to wear when emptying tanks as he too has been living dangerously-doing that job bare-handed!!

Sarah said...

I have found them to be a major improvement over the powdered lates gloves. I convinced my DH to start using the blue gloves for emptying tanks as he too, was doing that nasty job bare-handed.

wcforbespe said...

I figure there isn't anything in my holding tank that hasn't already been on or in my body, or my wife's. Now, I don't lick my fingers while I'm dumping, I keep my hands away from my face, I don't touch anything but the hose and fittings, and I try to handle the hose and fitting to avoid contact with the sewage, and I do wash my hands immediately after. But as far a pathogen control goes, if everyone is healthy it isn't much worse than changing a baby's diaper.

sKY:: said...

Do they make eco-friendly, biodegradable effective disposable gloves?? We tend to use a rubber glove that can be used over and over again, but it does have some porosity.

Anonymous said...

I use a FLUSH KING and that eliminates most of the problem. I am conflicted about the information about germs, etc. If a sewar hose has been sitting in storage over night or between stops, do the germs live that long. Throwing away two sets of gloves (one for set-up and one for pack up) is cetainly not the green thing to do. There seems to be a lot of opinion, what's the germologists have to say?

Anonymous said...

while living in a development where faulty septic tank installation caused many to overflow & seep into the streets, myself & a neighbor contracted hepatitis. I spent a month in isolation in the hospital and a year out of work due to the severity of it. My daughter also came down with a mild case of it and was out of school for 3 months. Believe me, I would NEVER touch a sewer hose without gloves. It's not only what's been through your body, but everyone else who has dumped there. When it touches the lid, pipe and even cement area it can pick up germs from other people who may have a contagious disease. It's not worth the few cents a glove to go without them.

Gene said...

My rig uses a macerator/pump. The hose always appears clean and you never touch anything nasty. Still, I always wear latex gloves. They appear clean afterwards but you can't be too safe.

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