Friday, June 1, 2007

You Can Make Your Own Toy Hauler!

Sometimes you can make what you need from stuff you have laying around. My good friend Bob Smith from New Paris, OH made a toy hauler out of a covered utility trailer. This is Bob and his better half - Wanda. Below is his converted - now a multi-purpose utility trailer/toy hauler.Since Bob installs commercial silos all over the United States he frequently needs a utility trailer to carry his tools to the project and keep them locked up while not in use. Bob got to thinking that he could also make a nice toy hauler out of his utility trailer and so he went to work. He installed an AC unit, roof vents, paneling and insulation, electric, port-holes (he wanted windows but needed to maintain the security of the trailer when he used it for work - so he opted for port-holes which are actually product viewers he uses in his silos), an inflatable bed, refrigerator, carpet and some furniture. Now his utility trailer is truly a multi-use vehicle. It’s an RV when he needs one, a tool crib for on the job and a toy hauler that will easily carry his ATV and motorcycle. Perhaps this utility trailer conversion is just what you need. It doesn’t cost that much to make, especially if you already have the utility trailer. You may also want to consider screening in the openings if you camp in mosquito land.My wife Marilyn and I are out here on the RV road having a lot of fun bringing you new and fresh ideas and meeting many wonderful people on the journey. I thank all of you for your continued readership. Perhaps we will meet up at a campground along the way. I certainly enjoy meeting you! Jim

14 comments:

Lloyd said...

Before you go this route (as I did), check to see if your road service company will cover it. I found out the hard way that mine wasn't covered by my RV road service company.
Do not ever doubt that the road service companies will fight you tooth and nail on the smallest detail.What was the detail? My homemade camper (as good as any factory made job) wasn't on their list of approved vehicles for their road service. Funny thing, when I bought the service, I told the agent my toy hauler was homemade.

Later the company acknowledged that I was indeed covered, but made no effort to make things right. So, I was stuck with the bill and the hassle, all because the homemade c

Anonymous said...

You guys are so smart you probely spent half the money that you would normaly spend on a factory built toy haler

Anonymous said...

Thanks for this article.... I have a 24' cargo trailer and have been searching for others who have converted to a toy hauler. I am thinking of framing the inside walls just as you would frame a house. After the framing is completed, running the pluming, electrical and insulation. The framing would tie together and keep the stress away from the cargo trailer walls, kinda like a box built within the trailer. I am not sure of what type of insulation to use???? I plan on adding windows and an air conditioner. Any comments??? I would be very interested in your feedback.. Thanks... DrwMull@aol.com

Anonymous said...

Go to your local Lowe's store and purchase some sheets of R-5 1/2 inch styrofoam (aqua blue) in the insulation dept. It's the right width to press up into the ceiling between the ribs and you don't have to use any glue. If you get down under the trailer you'll find that you can push this insulation up in the walls rather than removing the wall boards. Your choice!!

And, While you're there at Lowe's, pick up some Luan white masonite board and screw that to the ribs. It's 48 inches wide so it will cover quite a bit. I did this to my 16 ft cargo trailer and YOU WON'T believe the difference in temperature from on those HOT DAYs. Don't buy the white styrofoam to save a few pennies cause........ You'll be sorrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrryyy~~

Ashleigh said...

My husband and I just purchased a used Uhaul box truck to become our new toy hauler!!! I just thought I would share my excitment with you all!!!! I can't believe we got such a deal. Honestly we have been looking for a used affordable one for months now. Who would of thought you could use a Uhaul truck as a toy hauler!!!

Dan Hellier said...

Check out www.trickmytrailer.org That's dot org. or www.ncrvsolutions.com to see a complete conversion. Hope to hear from you all soon. Dan

Chad said...

I followed this link from the Survival Podcast. Smart indeed, save that money! Inspiring to me too.

Thanks,

Chad in Helena, Montana

Anonymous said...

I recently converted a 8'x22' continental cargo utility trailer in a similar way. I put the 1" blue styro insulation in the ceiling and 3/4" on the walls over the existing walls. Finished with white paneling on the walls and bright white tileboard in the ceiling. A small propane heater now raises the temp inside 40+ degrees even with venting through the roof vent and one small window. Three feet in from the back ramp I built an insulated wall with a regular RV door and screen door and a regular window A/C unit next to it. That gives me a "porch" to put the battery and wiring and Honda EU2000 generator. All the "dirty stuff" from camp travels in that 3'x8' space too. Camp chairs, outdoor rugs and tarps smell like camp fires so the wife likes them outside the living space. Inside the living space, we started with a queen bed in front with storage underneath. 8' long regular kitchen countertop with gray, plastic, patio cabinets underneath (those cabinets are lightweight and don't absorb moisture) and a matching 5' tall utility cabinet take care of our inside storage needs. Small bar sink in countertop drains down through a hole in the floor. No tanks to empty and nothing to winterize. Small chem toilet and a pull curtain round out the amenities. We thought about placing the wall farther in to allow a place for a ATV but that would cut into our living space and we'd just haul it in the back of the pickup anyway. Works great for us and almost everything came from Lowes. For more info or pictures, email me at chriskhallam@gmail.com.

Anonymous said...

I recently converted a 8'x22' continental cargo utility trailer in a similar way. I put the 1" blue styro insulation in the ceiling and 3/4" on the walls over the existing walls. Finished with white paneling on the walls and bright white tileboard in the ceiling. A small propane heater now raises the temp inside 40+ degrees even with venting through the roof vent and one small window. Three feet in from the back ramp I built an insulated wall with a regular RV door and screen door and a regular window A/C unit next to it. That gives me a "porch" to put the battery and wiring and Honda EU2000 generator. All the "dirty stuff" from camp travels in that 3'x8' space too. Camp chairs, outdoor rugs and tarps smell like camp fires so the wife likes them outside the living space. Inside the living space, we started with a queen bed in front with storage underneath. 8' long regular kitchen countertop with gray, plastic, patio cabinets underneath (those cabinets are lightweight and don't absorb moisture) and a matching 5' tall utility cabinet take care of our inside storage needs. Small bar sink in countertop drains down through a hole in the floor. No tanks to empty and nothing to winterize. Small chem toilet and a pull curtain round out the amenities. We thought about placing the wall farther in to allow a place for a ATV but that would cut into our living space and we'd just haul it in the back of the pickup anyway. Works great for us and almost everything came from Lowes. For more info or pictures, email me at chriskhallam@gmail.com.

Nick said...

Regardless of insurance hassles, project well done! I like it.

andy bell said...

Great site loads of real info used utility trailers are the cheapest way to have the best vacations and breaks away from home for pennies. Thanks Andy.

Anonymous said...

Now this makes sense. Have you considered installing solar panels on top? Also...do you have a generator? Does it have propane tanks? Does it have a battery pack? I love this idea. Thanks for posting

MariaS said...

toy haulers are really a cool thing to have in hard life...haul out into the rugged wilderness with my favorite leisure toy...for a tough adventurous day...

Anonymous said...

I am in the same boat so to speak. I have a 20' wells cargo that I have hauled motorcycles in. I added a 15.5btu roof a/c when I bought it. I later had the interior spray foamed. Re-installed the paneling added wall mounted tracks. Built a stoway queen sized bed and used it like that. Now I want to make it more livable for more that weekend trips. I am planning to get with Wells cargo since they have done some. I will add awnings first, a add-a-room for the back. A window in the door. I already added one above where the sink will go. Two larger windows above the bed in the back. Portapot for now, then water tanks below the floor in the front. Shower stall, water heater, 110 frig above the heater for efficiency...

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